Andrew Wyeth at SAM

Yesterday, I took the ferry over to Seattle to meet my friend Ginny for a trip to the Seattle Art Museum. It’s just a few blocks from the ferry dock, so an easy walk up and back.

After a quick bite of brunch at Homegrown, we entered the peaceful atmosphere of SAM. Upon arriving at the 4th floor gallery, we encountered a docent leading a large group. Though we might have learned a lot from tagging along, we chose to go in the opposite direction. This caused us to discover Wyeth’s work in the reverse order of his life, and it was fascinating.

I have never been a fan of his muted palette nor choice of subject matter, but this exhibit was a revelation in several ways. Wyeth was the son of a famous, commercially successful and extremely talented illustrator, Newell Convers (N.C.) Wyeth. He was taught by (apprenticed to) N.C. While I far prefer his father’s work to Andrew’s, reading about their intertwined lives gave me much to consider about their differences, as well as the people, places and life experiences that shaped them.

It was a thrill to be able to study the brush work from inches away. No reproduction – however fine – can capture the actual color and energy of brush strokes and pencil marks. Many of the details in his paintings are rendered so finely that they are the size of a single human hair. His patience must have been truly phenomenal. 

I came away with a new insight into his obsessions, and an appreciation for the bits of color and light which he allowed himself to sparingly include in his later work. It was not an uplifting exhibit, but it was illuminating.

If you are looking for art for your home, visit Redbubble today and use the coupon code NEWHOME25 to get 25% off!

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Andrew Wyeth at SAM

Yesterday, I took the ferry over to Seattle to meet my friend Ginny for a trip to the Seattle Art Museum. It’s just a few blocks from the ferry dock, so an easy walk up and back.

After a quick bite of brunch at Homegrown, we entered the peaceful atmosphere of SAM. Upon arriving at the 4th floor gallery, we encountered a docent leading a large group. Though we might have learned a lot from tagging along, we chose to go in the opposite direction. This caused us to discover Wyeth’s work in the reverse order of his life, and it was fascinating.

I have never been a fan of his muted palette nor choice of subject matter, but this exhibit was a revelation in several ways. Wyeth was the son of a famous, commercially successful and extremely talented illustrator, Newell Convers (N.C.) Wyeth. He was taught by (apprenticed to) N.C. While I far prefer his father’s work to Andrew’s, reading about their intertwined lives gave me much to consider about their differences, as well as the people, places and life experiences that shaped them.

It was a thrill to be able to study the brush work from inches away. No reproduction – however fine – can capture the actual color and energy of brush strokes and pencil marks. Many of the details in his paintings are rendered so finely that they are the size of a single human hair. His patience must have been truly phenomenal. 

I came away with a new insight into his obsessions, and an appreciation for the bits of color and light which he allowed himself to sparingly include in his later work. It was not an uplifting exhibit, but it was illuminating.

If you are looking for art for your home, visit Redbubble today and use the coupon code NEWHOME25 to get 25% off!

Ch-ch-ch-Changes

Autumn changes are in the air. I’m going to focus on the good and beautiful here, because you already know where to go for “hard” news.

We had a great visit with David last week; it’s always sad to say “Goodbye,” but that’s made easier by the fact that he is happy with his life in Montana.

We celebrated Gregg’s birthday with family (twice), hosted a cocktail party, took down my Dad’s art exhibit, the guys golfed three times, and we fit various fun/necessary activities in between.

Over the weekend, Gregg and I stopped by the Gallery at Savage Plants to hang my latest painting, “Abstract Autumn.” The nursery is so beautiful right now, full of brilliant autumn color and many lovely forms of art!

We took home “Riverhouse View.” I decided I want it to hang in our home; the subject makes me feel a little bit closer to David.

I will be replacing it in the Gallery with “For Andrew,” which has been hanging in our home for the past year or so.

The Savage Plants Holiday Open House will be held November 18th, so please mark your calendar!

Redbubble is having a 20% off sale today; just use the code NOSTRINGS at checkout! Here’s a link to My Redbubble Site.

Wishing you peace and joy as we all weather the changes in the air.

Abstract Autumn

I just completed a new painting called “Abstract Autumn.” It’s a bit of a departure, the finished work being inspired by geometry and music.

Intuitive painting always contains surprises, both in process and product. This painting is a “poster child” for that fact, so I thought I would share a bit of the transformation with you. Even I am surprised by the turns this one took, and I painted it!

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I almost stopped here, but the painting wouldn’t come to resolution. I liked many of its elements, but it felt like several paintings, rather than one. So then, this happened: masking tape and a paint roller.One of the insights that Flora Bowley shared with us in class was the need for willingness to “let go of things you like, to make room for things you love.” This is good to remember in art as well as in the rest of life.

“Abstract Autumn,” 36″x36″ acrylic on canvas, will soon be available for purchase at the Gallery at Savage Plants.

Condolences

I’m on my way to a memorial service today. This is been a season of passages, and I always seem to have trouble finding a condolence card that says something truly meaningful. Sometimes the art is attractive, but the saying on the front is tacky; sometimes the saying inside is beautiful, but paired with an odd cover, and some of them are downright nonsensical or unhelpful, reflecting our culture’s difficulty in dealing with grief. So few of them seem thoughtfully made. We received a great number of sympathy cards after Katie passed, and I still have all of them, so I know how important these are.

Gregg has been saying for years that I should compose cards, but the idea hasn’t delighted me. However, I’ve been putting my art on Redbubble, so it’s available on blank cards, and recently, I started painting my own condolence cards on watercolor paper, handwriting the sentiments inside. It’s an act of reverence and respect, endeavoring to match sentiment with imagery in memory of someone important in our lives. It’s a way to reflect upon their qualities, and upon those who survive them, with love. I’m taking one of those cards with me today.